Sharing is Caring <3 :)

Hey guys! This week were discussing the topic of disrupting the music industry, and before I jump into my thoughts on the guiding questions for this week I wanted to briefly talk about my thoughts on the TED Talks video, then move onto the creation on Napster and end with my thoughts on piracy and music sharing. 

I didn’t watch the entire video, but the part that I did watch I found really interesting. I think its funny how the fight between public broadcasting versus corporate owned music industries has been going on since 1939.  I thought that the rise of the Internet and various music downloading sites were the main cause of disruption and chaos in the music industry but its been going on way before that. “Its all about the competition”, Larry Lessig says, “even though these public broadcasters were giving their listeners something that was considered second best, they were still able to crack this legal cartel to access to music.” I couldn’t help but correlate BMI (as outlined in the video) as one of the original versions and maybe even inspirations for sites such as Napster and other music sharing websites. In Bradley’s (2006) article he describes how Napster was created for the “music obsessed” youth culture. The purpose of Napster was to enhance the circulation of music and break through barriers such as geography, ethnicity, age, sexuality and sex. I couldn’t agree more, not only does this go along with that was said about BMI’s intentions, but it just makes sense to me. Without public sharing of music I don’t think that artists from other countries would have their music played here. For example, Swedish House Mafia and other music artists from Europe are becoming ever so popular in Canada. I think It’s because of music sharing sites such as Youtube that allow people to discover music worldwide and unite over it.   

The research and forecasting done in McCourt and Burkharts (2003) article was spot on in my opinion.  They gave the advice that I would give if I were talking to music labels. The authors realized that the music industry really is in a state of transition and music producers should try and use the growth of the Internet as an opportunity and use it to their advantage.  The Big 5 are still able to keep their corporate domination by releasing Internet content, but also this gives opportunities for music to be shared among listeners like myself via Youtube and Torrents. Of course in their ideal world they would still like to be “selling” music and making money but don’t the artists always talk about how they do it for the love of sharing music with others. To me its not piracy to share music, its just the way the industry functions now.  I’ll buy tickets to their concert if that makes them feel better? But I am all for the downloading of music. #Sorrynotsorry

Image

I liked this picture because I can related my thoughts on music sharing and to sharing cookies. I love baking, and I love the feeling I get when people enjoy my baking. They don’t need to pay me for me to be happy, its my gift to them. On the same note I have also sold my baking and made a profit from it. This can be said about music producers. They should embrace the fact that we love their music and want to download it. And if we really love their work we may buy concert tickets or their CD.

Resources:

Bradley, D. (2006) Scenes of Transmission: Youth Culture, MP3 File Sharing, and Transferable Strategies of Cultural PracticeM/C Journal. 9(1).

McCourt, T., P. Burkart. (2003). When Creators, Corporations and Consumers Collide: Napster and the Development of On-line Music DistributionMedia, Culture & Society. 25 (3), pg. 333-350 
 
 

 

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6 responses to “Sharing is Caring <3 :)

  1. you are spot on with this comment “Without public sharing of music I don’t think that artists from other countries would have their music played here. For example, Swedish House Mafia and other music artists from Europe are becoming ever so popular in Canada.” i believe sharing of music has rejucvinated the music industry and allowed for many more artists to grab a slice of the money pie. It has forced the music industry to re-think and re-invent itself by following demand trends. I enjoy listening to various artists from multiple countries nd giving them a chance to find their way on my playlist. Do you believe music shareing has done more good than harm to the music industry?

    • You are spot on with this comment “Without public sharing of music I don’t think that artists from other countries would have their music played here. For example, Swedish House Mafia and other music artists from Europe are becoming ever so popular in Canada.” I believe sharing of music has rejuvenated the music industry and allowed for many more artists to grab a slice of the money pie. It has forced the music industry to re-think and re-invent itself by following demand trends. I enjoy listening to various artists from multiple countries and giving them a chance to find their way on my playlist. Do you believe music sharing has done more good than harm to the music industry?

      **sry that was UN-edited version above

  2. I love how your blogs are pretty much the exact same opinion as me, and give me new ideas to think about! It’s so true that artists make their music to be shared, and it’s better for the artist in a way that bands such as One Direction or singers like Ed Sheeran can become popular here in Canada. They bumped up ticket prices and I think that makes up for the price of a CD plus more. Also, I LOVE your idea for the picture. It is soo true! Music is like sharing baked goods–you do it to make others happy and should enjoy the fact that they like what you created. I think you hit it spot on.

  3. Music is something to be shared among society. Why was this not a big issue when people were taping songs off the radio and making mix tapes? Like you said, there have been problems in the music industry dating back to 1939. Illegal downloading is only contributing more to a system that was already broken to begin with. Why should we struggle to pay for music on our meager saleries in order to line the pockets of the already wealthy in our society. We don’t see any famous artists quitting the music industry because they can not live off what they are making. Illegal music downloading is really a double-edged sword for the music industry. Artists have a larger audience than ever before, but the aspect of having music in a physical form for sale is quickly disappearing.

  4. melaniemunroe

    I completely agree that music-sharing sites allow artists from all around the world to get their name out there. Anyone can easily become famous from a record label spotting a video of them singing on YouTube (Example: Justin Bieber). It allows us to connect to people worldwide and experience different cultures of music. Like you said, artists always say it’s about their “love of music” and “doing it for the fans”. So isn’t that what is most important? Record labels need to realize that we are not downloading music online for free to rebel against them, we are doing it in order to form a community worldwide of music lovers.

  5. Great example with “Swedish House Mafia and other music artists from Europe are becoming ever so popular in Canada. I think It’s because of music sharing sites such as Youtube that allow people to discover music worldwide and unite over it.” I would agree that most of us would not be aware of these artists if not for websites that allow us to hear at least a song of their music. Also I like your thoughts that
    “its not piracy to share music, its just the way the industry functions now. I’ll buy tickets to their concert if that makes them feel better? But I am all for the downloading of music.” I will still go to a concert and possibly purchase the odd CD if I really like the artist as well because we obviously want to support them since we are fans of their music. My issue is that are these record companies and musicians already making enough money that the whole problem of online piracy is not affecting the music industry as much as we tend to believe.

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